hazlittmag:

On Episode 32 of The Arcade: Emily Carroll

Creepypasta, murky horror, and the unease of dreams. Hazlitt audio producer Anshuman Iddamsetty speaks with cartoonist Emily Carroll about her debut book, Through the Woods.

You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunesStitcherSoundcloud, and via RSS.

spx:

HEY, YOU WITH THE FACE!

IT’S EMILY CARROLL’S SUPER-DEF POSTER FOR SPX 2014!

Leveled off from that San Diego Comic-Con rush?  

Good, because starting RIGHT NOW we’re kicking off a fight to the finish for the 2014 Small Press Expo. You’ve got about six weeks to get your mind right for the biggest and best independent comics festival in the country. 

All of the details for SPX 2014 are listed above on our event poster created by the INCOMPARABLE EMILY CARROLL. We’re so lucky to have Emily joining us as a special guest this year and to have her contribute her talents to our damn-fool idealistic crusade. 

Not familiar with Emily?  Her latest work - and first printed volume, Through the Woods was just reviewed on NPR.  Give a listen!

…

Maybe it goes without saying, we hope you’ll pay us a visit in September.

Aside from being a part of the most congenial, rollicking, drinking-from-the-firehose indie comics event you can imagine, every one of you who attends directly supports the SPX mission -  promoting, protecting and preserving independent comics (more about that later…).  

See you soon - and, if you don’t mind - help us spread the word!

spx:

HEY, YOU WITH THE FACE!

IT’S EMILY CARROLL’S SUPER-DEF POSTER FOR SPX 2014!

Leveled off from that San Diego Comic-Con rush?

Good, because starting RIGHT NOW we’re kicking off a fight to the finish for the 2014 Small Press Expo. You’ve got about six weeks to get your mind right for the biggest and best independent comics festival in the country.

All of the details for SPX 2014 are listed above on our event poster created by the INCOMPARABLE EMILY CARROLL. We’re so lucky to have Emily joining us as a special guest this year and to have her contribute her talents to our damn-fool idealistic crusade.

Not familiar with Emily? Her latest work - and first printed volume, Through the Woods was just reviewed on NPR. Give a listen!

Maybe it goes without saying, we hope you’ll pay us a visit in September.

Aside from being a part of the most congenial, rollicking, drinking-from-the-firehose indie comics event you can imagine, every one of you who attends directly supports the SPX mission - promoting, protecting and preserving independent comics (more about that later…).

See you soon - and, if you don’t mind - help us spread the word!

Emily and I started drawing fox comics one rainy afternoon - this is my side of things. I can’t remember which fairy tale this is from or why we scuttled it. Hm. HM.
Edit: Oh yes! This is from The Wedding of Mrs. Fox, a lesser known Grimm’s fairy tale. It’s a weird one!

Emily and I started drawing fox comics one rainy afternoon - this is my side of things. I can’t remember which fairy tale this is from or why we scuttled it. Hm. HM.

Edit: Oh yes! This is from The Wedding of Mrs. Fox, a lesser known Grimm’s fairy tale. It’s a weird one!

Hi everyone! Emily’s book launch for Through the Woods will be hosted by The Beguiling at the Lillian H. Smith library in Toronto on July 15th. If you’re in town please do join us! You can find more information here.

A new comic by Emily! Click through to read. :)

A new comic by Emily! Click through to read. :)

Please come say hi if you’re attending Bit Bizaar at TCAF! I’m doing a talk about game art, both 2D and 3D. Time TBA.

Please come say hi if you’re attending Bit Bizaar at TCAF! I’m doing a talk about game art, both 2D and 3D. Time TBA.

My Friend Janna, a story in Emily’s short story anthology coming out in July.

My Friend Janna, a story in Emily’s short story anthology coming out in July.

A preview of Emily’s book is up online, with the introduction and a snippet of the first story, Our Neighbour’s House. It comes out on July 15th, and I love it.

Drinking In Bars With Karla Zimonja

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This month, I have been a passenger. This is a mostly meditative post; if it seems to lack the spirit of the last it is because it’s not really a piece of ‘embedded journalism’: this will begin earnestly next month. I have been preparing to leave, giving away my room to a new tenant, giving…

Karla is wonderful  :) 

loseranthems said: Oh man, oh man, hopping on the 'answer questions about the industry' bandwagon :-) My one question is, how is the transition from graduating to finding your way into the industry? I've been told connections are a major thing, but for someone who's just out, what happens? (Also I love your work and everything you stand for and thank you for Gone Home. Really. So much. <3)

Thank you kindly for saying so, not to mention playing the game! I really appreciate it, anthems! <3

This is a multifacted, milage may vary question in a lot of respects, but I’m just going to hop right in.

Transitioning from a grad to a developer (in the mainstream sense) seems to depend on what you’ve studied, where you live, what kind of job you’d like to do (art/programming/design/admin,etc), your student debts, whether you’re looking for AAA, social, mobile, or deciding to forego all that (and The Industry at large) and create your own game.* I’ve only ever worked in social/mobile/independent games, so I’m coming from it from that perspective.

When I graduated (with no degree, but a diploma in 3D art and illustration) I was hired a week or so later by an art director in social games (I know) who’d seen some fan art I’d done online. I had no friends working in or on games at the time, so I feel like that kind of experience - of being cold called immediately after graduating - is something of an outlier.

Do do doo, let’s see.

Connections are undoubtedly handy, but at the same time, “networking” and mixers and LinkedIn culture were difficult. I felt weird about schmoozing and every time I was placed in that kind of situation, that Kids In The Hall skit was looping in my head:

When I did meet cool people, it was almost exclusively through Twitter, and it was because I genuinely liked them and the work they were doing. Emily (my wife), making dumb goofs with Steve G was how we ended meeting him in person, and a large part of why we’re going to GDC this year is to say hi to friends we met through tweets.

Long story short, making things and posting them online and listening to people on Twitter has been wonderfully helpful for me (and others, I’m sure).

I hope that’s helpful, at least in part!

*’Games as personal expression’ as compared to ‘games as traditional career’ (though that’s a false dichotomy, really) but I’m going to be answering about the ‘as career’ aspect, since I think that’s what you’re after.